Tag: hysterectomy

My Bloody Valentine

(Writing from February 15, 2011.)

Yesterday was Valentine’s Day. Also known as Monday, if you were me.

I’ve never liked the holiday. I am extremely, stubbornly, almost comically averse to all forms of manipulation, which made me a willful, hellish nightmare of a child for my poor mother. So the idea of a holiday that forces people to show their emotions to each other really gives me a case of the ass. I don’t even like greeting cards.

I also don’t like the idea of “being romantic.” It sounds smarmy and false, like saying “making love” instead of “having sex” or “fucking.” It gives me the willies when women talk about wanting their guy to bemore romantic. It’s like saying you want him to not be a guy anymore or something. Which is fine. But, like, you chose him, so it’s kind of unfair to change your mind this late in the game.

I know I should probably be a smart girl and use any excuse possible to receive chocolate and flowers, but I’ve never felt it. I also dislike red roses and diamonds because they are as unoriginal as it gets, so maybe that has something to do with it; I just really don’t like unoriginal displays of affection. I have no idea.

I am aware that by being too outspoken with my Valentine’s Day disdain, I am being a downer, and ironically enough, not terribly original, so I usually just keep my mouth shut and ignore it until it goes away. Kind of how I deal with it when someone is trying to talk about their version of religion with me.

My husband has been forbidden to partake in VD, and obliged me once again yesterday, bless his patient soul. I am oblivious to the date nowadays, and if it weren’t for Facebook, I wouldn’t have even realized it was a holiday.

***

I have wanted to write lately, and have been itching inside to write, but I have been unable to write for two reasons:

1. We were snowed in where I live, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for two weeks. I’m kind of done whining about it because honestly, after two weeks trapped in a house with me, I’m sick of listening to myself. So let me just say that it snowed a lot, the kiddo was out of school for two weeks straight, and we couldn’t drive anywhere. This meant I was trapped in a small house with my husband and son, and that meant I really didn’t get a chance to write. Or to be alone for two seconds. Or to not feel trapped in that chewing-off-your-own-leg sort of way.

2. One of the things stressing me out lately, that I really want to talk about here, is too gross for sensitive ears.

I’m having girl troubles. Trouble with the plumbing. Female issues. Pick your polite-company euphemism and run with it. (I’ll just sit here with the heating pad clutched against my abdomen and watch you run, thanks.)

But it’s making me mad that I’m afraid to write openly about what’s happening to me in my own piddly little blog that maybe ten of my friends read.

It’s making me mad because it’s stupid that we act like a part of the body that 50% of the population possesses is too disgusting for discussion, despite the fact that the male equivalent is talked about all of the time. We can talk about penises, dick size extension, erections, pills for erections, with no trouble at all, but you mention your period, and half of the room groans. Never mind that every one of us is brought into the world by a uterus.

That’s right, my squeamish little chickens. A uterus grew you. Eeeeeew. You’ve touched an icky uterus. But seriously. Show some fucking respect. Your mom gave up ten months of drinking alcohol and her cute figure to bring your punk ass into the world, and all you can do is act like a little pussy over some menstrual blood? You should be raising a toast to your mother’s blessed vagina every time you drink a beer, and pouring out a little on the ground in honor of the dead pre-pregnancy wardrobe she’ll never fit into again.

So as you’ve probably noticed, I’m done with the whole not-talking-about-it thing.

Because maybe if people were allowed to comfortably talk about things like this, I wouldn’t be desperately searching the internet, trying to figure out what the fuck is wrong with my body. Nobody talks about this shit, and it makes me angry.

About six months ago, I was at my yearly gynecological “well woman” exam, and I mentioned some odd things my body was doing for which I thought perimenopausal hormones might be responsible, like sweating, mood swings, and sleep disturbances.

My doctor scoffed at me, telling me I was too young to be starting perimenopause, despite the fact that all of the women in my family finish menopause earlier than average. (We all get our periods at 11, so it kind of makes sense.)

He even invalidated my concerns by joking to me, “Well, you’re too young for that, but you can blame your mood swings on that if it makes you feel better.”

Hardy fucking har.

When I told my mom what he’d said, she was indignant.

“Did you tell him that your mother was completely finished with menopause by 43?”

“Yes, Mom. I told him.”

“Did you tell him that all of your aunts did the same thing?”

“Yep. He just made a lame PMS joke about my symptoms.”

“Jerk.”

So of course, a few months later, my periods just stopped. Nothing for two months.

Five pregnancy tests later, I realized that ha ha ha, the universe ishilarious, and there would be no second child that I’ve always wanted magically growing in my womb, somehow defying the odds of my husband’s vasectomy a few years ago. (He quickly realized we couldn’t afford another child and got it done as soon as possible. He has more sense than me.) (I just want to buy tiny leopard skin coats and My Little Ponies for a baby girl. Is that so wrong?)

Nope. Not pregnant, just old. Oh, so very old.

After two months of nothing, my period started again on January 3rd, and hasn’t stopped since. I’ve been heavily bleeding for 45 days straight and counting.

I have always had really mild, regular, four day periods. I sometimes would feel crummy and crampy on the first day, but otherwise no big deal. But whatever is happening to my body right now is worse than any period I’ve ever had, and it’s been happening for 45 days in a row. It’s wearing me out. I spend days in bed when my kid is at school because I’m always exhausted.

If I sound dramatic, imagine yourself leaving a toilet bowl full of blood every single time you go pee, and you’ll understand why I’m so tired. It’s unnerving and scary, and every time I go to the bathroom, I have a minor freak out. I’m starting to wonder why I’m still alive, because the life is quite literally draining out of me. I’m relieved that my husband is the same blood type as me, because I think I’m going to need to borrow a pint soon.

I was supposed to have a sonogram/ultrasound two weeks ago, but then the snowstorms hit our city and shut everything down, so my appointment got canceled and moved. Now it’s coming up this Thursday, and I am relieved that we will hopefully figure out what’s causing this, but scared of the possibilities. It could be just hormones causing the bleeding, but it could also be cysts or fibroids.

If it is just hormones, then I qualify for a procedure called Novasure, in which the doctor will insert a rod in through my cervix out of which opens a mesh device that conforms to the shape of the uterus. Radio wave technology is then used to cauterize the walls to prevent them from rebuilding, hopefully ending my periods forever.

If I have fibroids or cysts, or if the Novasure procedure doesn’t work, I will have to get a hysterectomy.

I really don’t want a hysterectomy.

So that’s what’s happening in my life, and why I’ve been lame about writing lately. Snow and blood. Lots and lots of snow and blood.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Ovary and Out

(Writing from February 19, 2011.)

 

I’ve been up since 3 a.m. Yesterday it was 4 a.m. My brain has been extra thinky since I got the news at my doctor’s appointment on Thursday.

I have been having some yucky symptoms for over two years, and have been getting what I call the Little Lady Treatment about them from assorted doctors. As in, “Don’t worry, Little Lady, it’s all in your head.” Condescending tone. Pat pat, there there, you’re just a tired neurotic new mother. Try to get more sleep and stop worrying.

(Both genders do this, but it is more often the men in my experience. Yet I was surprised to be told I was “just tired” by a female doctor I tried, before I switched to my male doctor, who is the best listener I’ve ever encountered in the medical field. He’s run blood work on me multiple times, however, and we can’t find anything wrong. Not only have my blood numbers been within the acceptable ranges, they’ve been excellent. I should be feeling great.)

But despite my proclivity for rising too early, like today, I do get plenty of sleep. If I get up ridiculously early, my husband almost always gets me a nap in the afternoon, or I go to bed at 8 p.m. like your grandma, no big deal. My son is five now, and except for the rare nightmare or bed pissing, he sleeps through the night. I am not well-rested, but I get enough sleep. And still, I always feel weak and tired.

I have not felt like myself for the last two years, and nobody has believed me. I’m sure they encounter hypochondriac and drama queen patients aplenty, but I have been without health insurance most of my life, and before my pregnancy, could count the number of times I’d seen a doctor in my adult life on less than two hands. I try to take good care of myself, have been blessed to not have major health issues in my life, and do not like to go to the doctor. So believe me, I don’t go unless something is truly wrong. But these people don’t know me, and I’d look like a freak if I recited the above paragraph of my history to them.

The first weird symptom has been excessive sweating. Throughout my life, I’ve had dry skin. Lotion was my friend. I would sweat during exercise, and that’s about it. I could usually not bathe for a few days, and could hang a shirt back in my closet at the end of a day without worry. Now, I sweat through three T-shirts a day. It’s freaky, and pretty gross. In the last few years, I’ve gone from never stinking, to smelling like an end-of-the-day construction worker by noon. I’ve been telling myself that pregnancy changes our body chemistry, so I just have to get used to it. But this is so anomalous for me that I’ve had a hard time believing it.

The second symptom is constant constipation. I am a vegetable loving chick who eats a leafy green salad every single day. I exercise 45 minutes, 4-5 days a week. I take Metamucil. I drink twelve glasses of water a day. I eat Activia with fiber, even though I hate yogurt. Sometimes I even mix it with high fiber cereal. I eat a handful of prunes a day. I avoid cheese, bread, dairy (except for the nasty probiotic yogurt) and meat. I do everything I’ve ever heard will help keep a person regular, and I am still constipated. The doctor told me it’s irritable bowel syndrome and caused by stress. Which is not out of the realm of possibility. But still. Not normal for me.

The next major symptom is nausea, especially in the morning. It usually wanes by midday. But every morning, I struggle to eat something for my blood sugar, so I’m not shaky and light-headed, but I don’t want to eat at all. Eating when you are nauseated is, like, the worst thing ever. Often, I break saltines into four pieces and eat them slowly, one little piece at a time. I also nibble crystallized pieces of ginger my mom sends me from Trader Joe’s. Even though I try to avoid HFCS and have never been a soda pop drinker, I keep Coca-Cola around for desperate mornings, because when it’s really bad and I can’t handle crackers, little sips of flat, room-temperature cola are the only thing that helps. It is exactly like the first three months of pregnancy were for me. Except I’m not pregnant.

The weirdest thing about the nausea is that I have always had an iron stomach. I’m not a puker, and rarely throw up, even when I want to because I know it would make me feel better. I have always been able to eat anything: spicy food, alcohol, coffee; all of the things that people with tricky stomachs can’t handle. So once again, like the sweating, this is so not me.

I’ve also had the first migraines of my life, complete with scintillating scotomas, which is the name for the flashing lights that serve as a precursor to the thunderclap headache that follows.

But lately, I’ve had weird, somewhat sharp pains on my left side, pains that wake me out of deep sleep. And a seemingly never-ending heavy period that has been happening for 50 days at this writing. So my gynecologist ordered an ultrasound for last Thursday.

And… bingo! The ultrasound technician found a really big cyst on my left ovary, where I’ve been hurting. I mentioned all of the above symptoms to her, the nausea, sweating, constipation, lower back pain, migraines, mood swings, crazy-long periods, sporadic bleeding, and the constant exhaustion, despite what should be plenty of sleep, and she said that it could all be explained by this cyst. “As it presses on the ovary, it can cause it to release excessive levels of different hormones,” she said.

It was a huge light bulb moment for me. “It’s not in your head,” she actually said to me without any prompting. Despite the lousy news, part of me wanted to cry in relief. I’m not crazy! I’m not imagining this stuff! Hormones are chaos-making and powerful, and a part of me that controls them has been shooting out randomly high levels, possibly causing all of this weird crap I’ve been dealing with for the last two years.

Oh, shit. This means surgery, immediately popped into my head too, but at least I might have an answer. And a solution. Oh, please, let this be a solution. I am so tired of feeling awful. I want my life back. I don’t even ask that I feel great again, I just want to feel not bad all of the time. It’s breaking my spirit. I have a beautiful life view, and am usually just pretty happy to be here; I can easily Pollyanna my way back into optimism. But damn, it’s hard to cheer yourself up all of the time when you feel like ass. All these health issues have been a slow, drawn-out chipping away at the sunny side of my soul.

So I went from there to the waiting room, then back into the rabbit warren of offices to talk to my doctor, where I was informed that I would be having a biopsy procedure to take a chunk of the uterine lining to check for cancer, because my excessive bleeding could also be caused by this. Surprise!

Relieved that I’d groomed and shaved the appropriate parts in case of an impromptu pelvic exam, I tried not to look at the wicked and extremely long uterus grabbing tool the nurse had left for the doctor after informing me of the biopsy. Deep breaths, deep breaths, out through the nose, you can handle it, you have tattoos after all, right? Come on, girl. Get it together.

When the doctor came in, we discussed my options. I could have the Novasure procedure to stop the excessive bleeding, which is basically the cauterization of the uterine lining, plus minor surgery to remove the left ovary. Two week recovery. Or, we could just take out the uterus and ovary in one fell swoop, with a six to eight week recovery, just like my C-section.

My doctor mentioned that my uterus is enlarged (which prompted my husband later to make me giggle when he described me as “well-hung”). He said that this would make the Novasure procedure less likely to work, diminishing my chances of having lighter periods afterward.

I groaned, because I know how much a C-section sucks firsthand. A C-section is major abdominal surgery. I had no idea how debilitating they were until I had one when my nine pound, five ounce, twenty-three inch long son wouldn’t fit through my hips. So the idea of going through that again, without the awesome reward of a healthy baby at the end of it all just really super sucks.

But what is the point of going through the stress of having my uterus burned out (Will I smell it roasting? I grotesquely wondered to myself) and then being put to sleep in the hospital for the lesser surgery, when my enlarged uterus might make it so that the Novasure procedure doesn’t even work? Then I have a two week recovery from the ovary removal, a Novasure procedure with recovery, and then the six to eight week post-hysterectomy recovery anyhow. I have a five year old who needs his mom. I can’t draw this ordeal out over the next six months.

So with all of that in mind, after discussions with my husband, my mom, and internet pals who’ve gone through similar surgeries, I have decided to get the uterus and left ovary removed in one surgery. This is pending the results of the uterine lining biopsy and blood test they are also running to check for cancer markers. If cancer is detected, I will be sent to an oncologist who specializes in gynecological matters, and we’ll go from there. Big sigh. If you’re reading this, please send me some good thoughts, prayers, positive vibes, anti-cancer mojo, or whatever you’ve got to spare, because I really don’t want to go from there.

My mom offered to fly out to Oklahoma from Phoenix to help out with my five-year-old and post-surgery recovery, which is so awesome. I am so grateful and happy to have such a wonderful momma. My husband’s family is also amazing, and will help keep my son busy and distracted while I am in the hospital.

I’m trying to be brave, even though I know I’m in for a world of pain. It was a year after my C-section before I could do my entire ab workout DVD again. But I know I can get back there again. I did it before, after all. And the doctor said my C-section scar looks great, so he won’t have to make a seven inch incision like they had to to get my son out, just a five inch one. I’ll also be heading into the surgery with a normal amount of sleep under my belt, instead of exhausted from thirty-six hours of labor, which is very good. And I get to be unconscious this time, instead of awake and horrifically aware that on the other side of the sheet of paper, I’m being cut open.

I’m trying not to think about the petty stuff, like my poor twice-scarred stomach, and how bad I’m going to look in a bathing suit next summer after not being able to work out for months again. Vanity is boring and pointless, and in the end, it doesn’t mean a damned thing. Being alive for my son is all that ultimately matters to me. I’ve gone to the Dark Place a few times, and begged the universe, Buddha, God, Baby Jesus, the aliens, the Fates, Ghost Elvis, my guardian angels, and anyone else I can think of who might be out there listening, to please let me survive this and be strong and healthy again for my kid. He needs a mommy like me to look out for him in this world. In the meantime, the shower makes a really private place for a good ugly cry.

I’m also trying to remember that there is always something worse. Perspective, perspective, perspective. I’m still alive and this is treatable, so I have options. I have health insurance, a wonderful, supportive husband and family, and I can do this. I will get through this, and I will come out on the other side of post-surgical recovery, hopefully feeling better than I have for the last two years.

Other positives: If there is no cancer right now, then after this surgery, I will have 50% less of a chance for ovarian cancer, and a 100% less chance for uterine cancer. And no more periods ever again. Bright side, right?

This morning, the sound of a loud voice in my head was what woke me up. I don’t know if it was my subconscious comforting me, or a sign, but I’m going to look at it as a good thing either way. It said, calmly and confidently, Everything is going to be okay.

I’m going to trust that voice. It is going to be okay.

It is.

Competitive Convalescing

 

(Writing from March 24, 2011.)

I woke to the sound of a soothing female voice saying, “Hi Tawni! You’re awake and in post-surgical recovery, and you’re doing great.”

I couldn’t open my eyes. The lights were unbearably bright. I knew it wasn’t heaven, because it was so ridiculously loud. The sounds of machines beeping, conversations in the room around me, and the clanking and shuffling of surgical necessities assaulted my eardrums. Through my squinting, I could make out the form of a petite, softly rounded woman standing in front of the surface of the sun.

“I can’t keep my eyes open. It’s too bright,” I told her. She assured me this was normal.

I started shaking uncontrollably. I wasn’t afraid, so it felt like the involuntary shivering of the very cold.

“I’m going to give you some Demerol now that should make the shivering stop.” It worked immediately. “We’re going to move you to your own room now,” she said.

A large, friendly man introduced himself, and I tried to look at him. It was getting easier to see, and as we smiled at each other my eyes cracked halfway open.

He wheeled me down the halls to my room while I giggled. I was warned that I might come out of anesthesia feeling disoriented and confused, that I might even cry, but all I felt was relief. I had survived the surgery! I had woken up after anesthesia, and the surgery I’d dreaded for the last two weeks (since we scheduled it) was finally over. Hallelujah!

For me, the anticipation of pain is always worse than the actual pain itself, be it emotional, dental, or medical. One of the ways I mentally comfort myself in the middle of the nasty parts has always been to imagine life fast-forwarded to the point of after. Just think how good you will feel when this is all over, I will tell myself, This pain is only temporary. It always helps.

The nice fellow wheeling me to my room seemed surprised by my cheerful mood, and acted a bit uncomfortable with my odd behavior. I’ve always been a lightweight about drugs, and morphine was no exception. I was ready to party. He pushed my hospital bed down the length of the hallway on the women’s floor, past the window of new babies I would never take home, and stopped outside room 240.

“I still need to mop the floor!” barked a woman wheeling a bright yellow bucket of water, “It’s not ready yet!”

“That’s okay. We can wait,” I told her, laughing, while my escort gave me a weird look. A nurse came quickly walking down the hall from the central work station, where computer monitors and medical professionals huddled near coffee and bagels.

The approaching nurse said to the orderly, “Room 204 is clean; you can put her there,” and down the hall we moved, past the glass and the babies, to the opposite side of the building. I exclaimed, “Weeeeeeee!” as we rolled, garnering two strange looks from my cruise directors.

Deposited in room 204, I waited for my husband to arrive as a nurse hooked up my morphine drip to a little hand-held button I could push as often as I needed. It was like I was on Jeopardy! and the answer was “What is IV relief from pain that makes you feel like you’re floating?” Good stuff.

My husband and his parents, who had waited with him during my surgery, came into my room. Apparently it took a long time to rouse me from anesthesia post-surgery, because they mentioned they had been waiting a long time. The surgery was at 8:30 am, the doctor told them I did great around 9:30 am, and it was now 12:30 pm.

They reported that once inside me, the doctor discovered that my uterus was not only twice the normal size, it had adhered to my abdominal wall, probably after my C-section 5 years ago. Normally, when this happens, the adhesion is one quarter of an inch thick, but mine had thickened to over an inch. It involved abdominal nerves and pulled the intestine out of place, causing my nausea, stomach pain, and constipation to worsen as it progressed.

Before the surgery, I could no longer eat, and had been reduced to nibbling fruit and not much else every day. I’d lost 12 pounds in the last few weeks. Immediately after surgery, even though anesthesia is known for making people feel nauseated, I already felt amazing relief. It was the first time in forever I’d not felt like I might throw up. I was elated, and continue to be every day.

With the end of my debilitating nausea behind me for perspective, it’s going to be a very long time before I’m in a bad mood again. All problems seem so petty when you don’t have your health. When you’ve been in pain and puke purgatory for more than a year, and people complain about little things like rain, you really want to tell them to stop it. Let’s just say that I’m a bit more particular and stingy with my sympathetic comments on Facebook now. If you or your family member is sick, you have my heartfelt condolences. But if you’re whining about traffic, shut up and remember that you’re lucky to be healthy enough to drive, you whiner.

I am so grateful to be feeling better. I’m probably going to be obnoxiously Pollyanna about it for a while, but I don’t care. I went into surgery knowing I was lucky to be able to have surgery and options for better health, health care, a supportive husband, and family to help me. There are so many people dealing with natural disasters like earthquakes who would love to be merely having surgery right now. I am blessed to be alive, and I know it.

The doctor had to cut my uterus off the abdominal wall, making my surgery more serious than a typical abdominal hysterectomy. My left ovary was multi-cystic, with a ping pong ball-sized cyst, so he removed that, plus the left fallopian tube was covered with small cysts, and he took that too. He also removed my cervix, which had small cysts. On the bright side, this all means I have no chance for cervical or uterine cancer, and only half the chance of ovarian. And my labs all came back clean for cancer as well. My cysts were full of liquid, not cancer. Yay!

I can also eat again! Food sounds good again! I can’t believe it! I can’t even remember the last time I could eat anything before 1 pm every day, and now I can eat breakfast like a normal person again. I am still in the amazed phase of disbelief. Because I felt like I had a stomach flu that never went away, I had stopped being able to drink coffee, and I can have a cup again in the mornings. And I have been eating healthy oatmeal and yogurt and fruit for breakfast, all unthinkable before the surgery. It feels like a miracle. It is a miracle. I’m so happy.

After my husband’s parents left for the afternoon to take care of our son, a nurse wheeled a baby into my room. “I brought you your baby!” she chirped happily. We told her already had our baby at home, and that I had only given birth to a uterus, and she got confused. I told her they’d wanted to put me in room 240, but had moved me last minute to room 204 because it was clean, and she figured it out. It looked like a very cute baby, but no thanks. I’ve already done the “trying to breastfeed an infant every hour with a 7 inch incision on my abdomen” thing once in this lifetime.
I was determined to get up out of bed and start peeing on my own again and walking as soon as possible. I wanted to get home to my son so his life could be closer to normal. We are closely bonded, and I knew that his momma being gone at the hospital was probably rocking his little world in a bad way.

The day after surgery, the nurse took out my catheter and took me off the morphine drip. She had to leave the IV of Doom in the middle of my arm because it took two people and two painful botched attempts to place the IV in both of my hands before they finally got one into my arm. I have tiny, stupid veins. I think wanting to get the IV of Doom out of my arm really motivated me to work towards an early hospital release.

I was up and walking, peeing on my own, and passing gas (anesthesia shuts down your gastrointestinal system… they won’t let you leave until you fart) like a champ by that afternoon. My doctor came to see me and said, “Wow. You look better than any of the patients I’ve visited today, and you had the worst surgery!” The freakishly competitive part of me basked in his praise like an eager puppy. I was going to be the best at recovering from surgery! I was going to WIN. Haha.

Thursday was the day after my surgery. I asked if I could go home by Friday, and he said, “Well, normally I’d keep you until Saturday after your type of surgery, but we’ll see. You’re looking much better than I expected.”

I was released early Friday morning. Ever watched the show Friends? You know Monica, the character with the obsessive-compulsive cleaning streak and brutal competitiveness? That’s me. The stubborn, iron will that makes me annoying to live with makes me very determined in positive ways, too.

My husband took great care of me over the weekend, and I got my staples removed by a nurse on Monday. Then my dear, sweet momma flew in from Arizona to take care of me for a week so my husband could get back to work. She was so amazingly helpful, and because I was feeling so much better than any of us expected, we were able to have a really nice visit.

She made me too much delicious food, as is her way, and I think I probably gained back 5 pounds in a week. I don’t care. It was so nice to see my momma, and I got spoiled. The day she left, I stood in the kitchen and whined to my husband, “I already miss my mom!” She helped so much by allowing me to really rest for a week, as she cooked food for everyone, and played with my 5-year-old son. She also drove him to and from school, which was wonderful.

When my mom took me to my first doctor check up since the hospital, it was less than 2 weeks after my surgery. He told me that most people come in for a check up at this point wearing a nightgown and slippers, still hurting and feeling awful. I was dressed, wearing make-up, and walking normally. He couldn’t believe it.

Normally, he doesn’t give his patients permission to drive until 6 weeks post-surgery, but when I explained to him that I have been taking only 1 Percoset every 6 hours, instead of the 2 every 4-6 hours allowed, and rotating them with Motrin, he gave me permission to drive my son to and from school, as long as I’m on only Motrin and not Percoset when I drive. This permission eliminates the only problem the surgery created for my family, as my husband can’t miss any more work to drive our son twice a day.

He told me that my healthy diet and the fact that I was in such good shape going into surgery is probably why I’m recovering so much faster than most of his patients. That is always nice to hear from your doctor, isn’t it?

So life is already going back to normal, and my recovery from surgery is progressing beautifully thus far. I am so thankful for all of the prayers and positive thoughts from friends and family, and hope this update finds you all doing well and feeling great. I’m going to post some pictures from my adventures in surgery below, including a picture of Dr. Lisa Masterson from the television show The Doctors, who is the one who performed my C-section 5 years ago that healed so poorly. As I sat in my hospital bed watching her, I thought it was pretty funny. Life is so strange sometimes. 🙂

xoxo.


















The Dominant Vagina

(Writing from April 8, 2011.)

 

SelfPotraitApril2011

 

I watched a show the other night on TLC (The Little Channel) that has haunted me ever since. It was called Strange Sex.

I’ve watched the show before. I try to catch it when I can. Normal, average sex is pretty fascinating to me already, so I am all aboard the strange sex train.

Wait. That didn’t come out right.

And that’s what he said.

Anyhow.

The show that I watched as I drifted off into a Percoset-laced slumber featured a woman with two vaginas. She has two vaginas and two uteri. She got pregnant twice in one of the vaginas, and has two healthy kids. And two healthy vaginas. This blew my mind.

I am presently recovering from the removal of my measly one uterus, so the idea of having two of these uterus jerks to torment a woman filled me with sympathy for her. I wondered if she has to deal with two periods every month. I wondered if she could get pregnant in both vaginas at the same time, or with the children of different men. I wondered about the porn movie making possibilities available to a woman with an extra opening to offer. She could probably make a fortune.

Apparently she has a dominant vagina that she uses for sex, and a smaller vagina that is the width of a pencil. (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/woman-two-vaginas-strange-sex-174009) I discussed the show, and the dominant vagina versus the lesser vagina with my husband a few minutes ago, where he sat watching golf as I typed this. I theorized that it would be very convenient to have a tiny vagina that you could use after making the discovery that your date had a very small penis. You could choose the appropriate vagina based on the size of the penis. Or you could save it up as a special treat for your well-endowed significant other, like, “Guess what, birthday boy? You get the teeny vagina tonight!”

From the depths of this odd conversation, my husband pulled out the name of his next album. It will be called Choosing the Appropriate Vagina Based on the Size of the Penis. It will be a concept album, and when you play it at the same time as the movie The Wizard of Oz, it will sync up in ways that mystify and amaze you. Brace yourself.

***

I heard a Styx song today that somehow filled me with nostalgia and rage at the same time. It was on the radio in my car after I dropped my son off at school this morning. My iPod ran out of batteries, and when I turned on the radio, the song was just beginning. It was that “Babe” song by Styx. Babe, I’m leaving… came pouring out of my car’s speakers, drowning me in sickeningly syrupy vocals and inane, insipid lyrics. Oh my god. It was so bad that I actually got angry listening to it. I had to turn it off. What a ridiculous piece of horse crap. I remember listening to it as a kid. “Mr. Roboto” is a travesty as well. Are you kidding me with these songs, Styx? What’s the deal with airplane food and Styx?

***

I used my laptop to take today’s Self Portrait of the Day. I will probably do this a lot. It’s so much easier than using a camera, and then having load the pictures onto a computer. I can’t believe how easy my laptop makes everything. I already sound so lame and ancient, telling my son tales of how I never had computers or the internet as a child. He just looks at me like I’m boring him when I say such things. That might have something to do with the fact that he’s five, but you know. Whatever. I destroyed my body to bring you into the world; you will act like I’m fascinating, damn it.

I put on lipstick for today’s picture because I never wear make-up anymore, and lipstick is pretty intense. Lotta bang for your twenty seconds spent primping. I usually only take photos of myself when I’m made up to go out somewhere, and these unplanned shots are making me painfully aware of my pasty, washed-out redhead complexion and invisible blonde eyelashes. I’m like an auburn ghost. So yay, lipstick. Today I have lips. No promises for tomorrow.

Also: I’m wearing a convalescence nightgown in today’s picture. I have a healing five-inch-long (I measured it because I’m weird) incision on my lower abdomen right now, so I have to wear nightgowns or dresses; only clothes that don’t rub on the wound.

I took the photo at the top of this blog first. My son came into the office to see what I was doing, and a mother/son photo shoot ensued. I will leave you with some of our goofy shenanigans, wacky hijinks, and madcap tomfoolery below.

Happy Friday, pals. Make it count. I don’t really know what I mean by that, but make it count anyway. You can do it. I believe in you.






Saturday Night Self-Whoretraits


(Writing from April 9, 2011.)

Lazy. And bored. And a little bit slutty. When you have big boobs, it’s hard not to look slutty in tank tops. It’s not my fault. Stupid boobs.

I had a lazy, lazy, lazy Saturday. I can safely say that I accomplished absolutely nothing productive today, unless you count the big pitcher of orange, grapefruit, spinach, apple and carrot juice I made for my son, my husband and myself. But the juicer did most of the work, so really, all I did was cut up some fruit.

I am under strict doctor’s orders to be lazy, so I don’t know if I can technically call a 6-8 week post-surgical recovery period lazy, but it sure feels lazy to me. Firmly 4 weeks into it, I am going to try to take my first walk for exercise tomorrow morning, because the pain is always at its lowest after a night of rest. I’m excited to move again. I feel like such a slug.

My husband tells me I am the worst patient in the world because I don’t do relaxation very well. It has taken everything in me to not set back my recovery with too much activity. Only the thought of having to feel taken care of like a helpless child for even longer than planned keeps me from pushing it. I have been on my own in the world since I was just-turned-17, and having to depend on other people is really hard for me. I don’t like it. I don’t like feeling weak. It pisses me off. And I have trust issues; I can admit it.

I spent the first part of the day trying to read a book called The Passage, which bored me so much I stopped halfway in. I gave up. It kept jumping from character to character without taking the time to really make me care about them first. I was having a hard time following the story, and it was making me work really hard with no “Oh, that’s where this was going” sort of eventual pay-off.

When we’d finally jump back into the seemingly abandoned character’s life, I found I still didn’t understand what was happening or care about them anymore than before. I got really mad at the book and started skimming ahead, just to see if it got any better. I noticed it didn’t, and gave up.

This is the second time in a day I’ve given up on a book. Yesterday’s abandoned (reader)ship involved a memoir that was supposed to be about losing virginity and teenage years, but felt more like a writer trying way too hard to impress me. She tried so hard, in fact, that the story was completely lost. It was clumsy and obvious and distracting, the way she was trying to write.

(It reminded me of a musician trying too hard to impress people with difficult guitar solos and forgetting about the song. It’s all about the song, stupid. And writer, it’s not about your ability to write in a complex style, to reference as many poets as possible, or to change narrative modes every other chapter, it’s all about the story. Remember the story? Yeah, me neither.)

The final nail in the coffin was the spelling of “boo-boo” (as in a child’s painful boo-boo) as “bo-bo.” Ugh. Bo-bo? Really? That is something you might name your pet monkey, but it is not how you spell “boo-boo.”

I gave up a little past halfway through, and I’m a really fast reader. I can usually plow through anything to the bitter end. But this book felt insulting. Do your literary masturbation in privacy next time, please, writer. And I’m not referring to the sexual subject matter at all.

Maybe the pain medication I’m taking (only Motrin today, no Percoset) is making me scattered or something? But neither of these books seemed to get any better as read them. I felt like I gave them more than a fair shot. So I put them both into the “back to the library” pile, and moved on to the new Tina Fey book my husband bought yesterday. I’m already halfway through that one because it’s awesome. I adore Tina Fey so hard. She is so funny and smart.

Over the last few weeks, my husband has fallen into the routine of setting up Ma’s Daily Convalescin’ Spot in the corner of our giant home sectional couch (say that really fast). This involves a series of pillows for back and neck support and my giraffe comforter beneath it all because animal prints make me happy. We have managed to replicate the angle of the hospital bed that put minimum pressure on my abdominal incision while allowing me to sit up and hang out with the rest of the humans.

I have a stack of books nearby and the remote control, my computer, and an extra blanket with which to cover my cold old lady legs. This set-up is not unpleasant. I am still eager to be able to exercise again, but if I must be a couch potato, I am okay with my current arrangement. So tonight’s Self-Whoretraits were taken using my laptop camera as I languished in my nest of rest.

(I’m calling them Self-Whoretraits from this point forward, because it feels a bit attention whorish to be posting pictures of myself all of the time. Not that there’s anything wrong with being an attention whore. But let’s be honest.)

I’m wearing one of my two slutty hippie dresses. Made of filmy, thin cotton in a crazy patchwork design, my two slutty hippie dresses are an around the house staple in warm weather. They are not fit for public, but as house dresses go, they are wonderfully comfortable. The lighting is also terrible because it is dark outside, but we can pretend it looks artsy this way, just like we pretend JLo is a triple threat who can dance, act and sing.

I hope you made it count yesterday, like I asked. Happy rest of the weekend. Seacrest out.